Blog

Daily Dispatch 8/20/2018

A new series in which we (will aspire to) offer a sampling of today’s headlines on immigration, race, and related stories.

August 20, 2018

discusses the impact of Attorney General Session’s recent decisions to reopen 8,000 immigration cases, which had been administratively closed, on judicial independence.  

Haiti Update: Jean Henry Céant is nominated as new prime minister

On July 14, 2018 Haiti’s prime minister, following widespread demonstrations sparked by fuel prices increases. Lafontant was blamed for the poor execution of the plan's roll-out - particularly by the business community, which criticized Lafontant for lack of preparation regarding security. Seven people died in the demonstrations. The fuel price increases were suspended - but the pressure behind those increases remain.

Daily Dispatch 8/15/18

A new series in which we (will aspire to) offer a sampling of today’s headlines on immigration, race, and related stories.

August 15, 2018:

Head of USCIS defends his decision to remove the phrase “” from the agency’s mission statement, arguing that the agency exists to serve citizens, not immigrants.

Daily Dispatch 8/14/18

A new series in which we (will aspire to) offer a sampling of today’s headlines on immigration, race, and related stories.

August 14, 2018:

U.S. citizen parents their 4-year-old adopted daughter may be deported after her immigration case is denied and visa set to expire.

Trump’s War on Immigrants has Many Fronts

The Trump administration is waging a war on immigrants with many fronts, including: Adopting "zero tolerance" policies at the border, expanding detention, seeking ways to limit legal immigration, making it harder for people to become permanent residents and citizens, and launching a massive review of people who have become naturalized citizens. On all fronts, Trump’s war is being waged using existing policy instruments and institutions. We must acknowledge this reality - as the entire system is deeply flawed.

Lessons from Haiti: Another View on the Nicaraguan Crisis

Since April 18, the solidarity movement has been struggling over how to interpret events in Nicaragua and where to push in terms of advocacy and/or speaking out. As with many people following the situation, I have watched and listened to friends take a harsh line towards one another and with me about articles I have written. While the division in the solidarity movement is not in and of itself new, the tensions have boiled over. The gulf between people over how the situation is understood and should be represented is enormous. There are even calls from some to support U.S.

Inspirational and Influential Women of the World: Dolly Pomerleau Part III

I first met Dolly in January of 1996. I had just moved to Washington, D.C. and was looking for a job. I had contacted the Quixote Center a few months prior about the possibility of setting up a small project to donate funds to a clinic in Matagalpa, Nicaragua. The clinic served the neighborhood of the Mothers of Heroes and Martyrs, where I stayed in July of 1995 with a Witness for Peace delegation. This had been my first trip to Nicaragua, and the group I was with was eager to help out the community in a meaningful way.

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